Brother sacrificed his right arm to bring my soul back. So it follows that the reverse should be possible.

Brother sacrificed his right arm to bring my soul back. So it follows that the reverse should be possible.

Brother sacrificed his right arm to bring my soul back. So it follows that the reverse should be possible.

Brother sacrificed his right arm to bring my soul back. So it follows that the reverse should be possible.

Brother sacrificed his right arm to bring my soul back. So it follows that the reverse should be possible.

"Cunt again? It was odd how men … used that word to demean women when it was the only part of a woman they valued."

 sheriff-swan:

— Asha Greyjoy, A Dance With Dragons   (via scrlett)

WHERE’S THAT GIF OF THE JUDGE BANGING THE GAVEL AND GOING OOOOOOOOOOH

image

(via aryousavvy)

mydeadfather:

evienator:

octoberrainfall252:

Not taking any chances

I scrolled past this and the guilt was too much

will this help me get into college?

mydeadfather:

evienator:

octoberrainfall252:

Not taking any chances

I scrolled past this and the guilt was too much

will this help me get into college?

rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real
Bonus:
rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real
Bonus:
rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real
Bonus:
rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real
Bonus:
rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real
Bonus:

rainbowthinker:

Armin keeping it real

Bonus:

image

image

image

image

msh30:

team i can’t do math for shit but i can write a 3 page english paper in less than an hour 

blshiit:

DO U NEED A STEPMOM?!?

partyintheurl:

where’s the lie

partyintheurl:

where’s the lie

coooooooooooooorvo:

why is ed called the fullmetal alchemist hes not even full metal hes half metal

maybe 1/3rd metal

1/3 metal alchemist

excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”
excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”

excepttheeyes:

“One of the most horrifying things about war is how it leaves children fatherless and motherless.” The most powerful way she could dramatize that idea, she says, was to kill a set of parents that were dear to readers. “I had no intention of killing [Lupin],” says Rowling. “But then it dawned on me he had to die.”

squarecutorpearshape:

WHO IS RAISING THIS CHILD

derinthemadscientist:

lectorel:

gaycrime:

wow The Onion is dropping a lot of truth for a work of satire

The onion isn’t satire. The onion is pure progressive rage with a thin satire coating.

So you’re saying it has layers?

derinthemadscientist:

lectorel:

gaycrime:

wow The Onion is dropping a lot of truth for a work of satire

The onion isn’t satire. The onion is pure progressive rage with a thin satire coating.

So you’re saying it has layers?

"To fight monsters, we created monsters of our own."

Pacific Rim, 2013


One of the greatest things about this quote (and this movie) is that it had all the potential in the world to spread the dark and terrible (and often truthful) idea that in order to fight the darkness, one must absorb some of that darkness. It was very prominent in The Dark Knight trilogy, especially as articulated by Harvey Dent: “You die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.” 

Pacific Rim doesn’t do this. Mankind bands together for a true world war. There are already enough monsters coming for them; they do not need to become monstrous themselves. The monsters they create are not beasts but guards and armor to protect, not universally destroy. The jaegers rarely deliberately destroy massive structures (remember Lady Danger carefully stepping over a large walkway and nimbly navigating between buildings during the fight in Hong Kong). The pilots in the jaegers are very human and imperfect but are still heroes. They may have created monsters, but they did not become them.

Everyone and their mother has lauded this, but it bears repeating: in Pacific Rim, mankind’s power is not in its capacity for destruction or power or control or harnessing its deepest instincts but instead in its humanity—its ability to rebuild, to persevere, to empathize and to understand. 

(via mymarysunshine)